What Agreements Exist Between Canada And China

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In 2006, Stephen Harper became Prime Minister of Canada and pursued a more active foreign policy by highlighting ties with democracies and criticizing undemocratic regimes such as China. Mr. Harper said his faith in Canadian values, such as human rights, should not be overtaken by the “almighty dollar.” [Citation required] For example, the Harper government granted the Dalai Lama Canadian citizenship and criticized China`s human rights record and accused him of economic espionage. Mr. Harper also delayed a scheduled meeting of foreign ministers and increased Canada`s engagement in Taiwan, which again displeased Beijing. [Citation required] At the APEC summit in November 2006, China initially appeared to be emerging from the formal meeting between Mr. Harper and President Hu, but Hu instead chose a brief informal meeting with Harper, who did not attend the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Until 2015, some 460 Canadian companies were present in China. [10] Justin Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada in October 2015, and China-Canada relations improved for at least two years. In 1984, Chinese Prime Minister Zhao Ziyang visited the second Trudeau government six months before the affair and became the first Communist leader to address The Parliament of Canada. [8] [11] Zhao signed the China-Canada Investment Protection Agreement. [7] Zhao was then placed under house arrest for 15 years and died under him because he opposed the 1989 Tiananmen Square crash. [12] Learn more about Canada`s trade and investment agreements: types of contracts and the gradual development of trade and investment agreements.

Should the Harper government focus its efforts on implementing a FIPA with China? The answer, of course, depends on the administration`s direct trade and investment priorities, but we believe that providing additional time or energy for this company would be a fundamental waste of critical resources. FIPA is a binding bilateral investment agreement between Canada and a strategic investment partner. However, given the relatively weak foreign direct investment (FDI) flows between Canada and the CPP, it may be useful to reconsider the value of a Sino-Canada agreement. Of course, the United States and Europe remain by far the two main sources of foreign direct investment in Canada. At the same time, Canadian direct investment abroad remains highly concentrated in the United States and Europe, with a fairly large margin. Simply put, China is a relative non-entity when it comes to the issue of foreign direct investment. As a result, Canada could be better served if it focused on a trade agreement that would protect and encourage investment in both countries and protect and encourage existing trading patterns that are currently on the rise. Chart 1 shows the value of Chinese imports into Canada between 1997 and 2007. In November 1997, the Government of Chretien signed with the Government of Jiang Zemin the consular agreement between the Chinese and Canadian authorities, the agreement between the Chinese National Tourism Administration and the Canadian Tourism Commission on tourism cooperation, three development assistance agreements and an exchange of letters between China and Canada for the establishment of other consulates general. [7] Canada-China Promotion and Reciprocal Protection of Investments Agreement or Canada China FIPA is a bilateral investment agreement between Canada and China that came into effect on October 1, 2014. [1] [2] The Foreign Investment Protection Agreement (FIPA) or the Foreign Investment Protection and Promotion Agreement (FIPPA) are Canadian names for ILO.

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