The Paris Agreement A New Beginning

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55 The fact that the title of “Paris Implementation Agreement” was proposed and apparently rejected by the ADP underlines Annalisa Savaresi`s argument that the Paris Agreement can be considered an implementation agreement. Annalisa Savaresi, The Paris Agreement – A Joiner, EJIL:TALK! (February 16, 2016), on www.ejiltalk.org/the-paris-agreement-a-rejoinder/. 96 As one observer in Paris put it: “You can also agree that all fairies should also ride unicorns.” Jeff Goodell, Will the Paris Climate Deal Save the World?, Rolling Stone (January 13, 2016), on www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/will-the-paris-climate-deal-save-the-world-20160113?page=2. 57 Daniel Bodansky, Legal Options for U.S. Acceptance of a New Climate Agreement 14 (Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, May 2015), on www.c2es.org/docUploads/legal-options-us-acceptance-new-climate-change-agreement.pdf. 19 At the United Nations signing ceremony on 22 April 2016, 175 countries signed the Paris Agreement, which appears to have ever signed an international treaty in a single day. A list of signatories can be accessed at www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/blog/2016/04/parisagreementsingatures/. Only Nicaragua expressed objections to the agreement at the last cop-21 plenary session and at the signing ceremony. See statement by Paul Oquist Kelley, Minister, Private Secretary for National Policy to the President of Nicaragua, at the high-level signing ceremony (22 April 2016) in webtv.un.org/search/paul-oquist-kelley-nicargua-high-level-signature-ceremony-for-the-paris-agreement-national-statements/4858083079001?term=Nicaragua.

194 Tom Switzer, Paris Agreement Is a Triumph of Hope over Facts, Sydney Morning Herald (December 30, 2015), www.smh.com.au/comment/paris-climate-agreement-is-a-triumph-of-hope-over-facts-20151227-glvfd0.html. AbstractThe Paris climate conference is expected to launch the world, the biggest challenge humanity faces in adopting a new climate agreement. The outlook for the conference was rather bleak. The painstaking and increasingly frequent meetings of the body responsible for drafting the text of the Paris Agreement, the ad hoc working group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP), had made only limited progress. These negotiations had eloquently demonstrated the futility of technical negotiations without political consensus on the essential elements and characteristics of the new agreement. To the surprise of many, the Paris conference was concluded on 12 December 2015 with the adoption of a new climate agreement. This article reflects the Paris conference and its results. First, in the history of the climate regime, the conference meets.

This explains what was expected of the parties. Finally, it assesses the outcome of the conference in the complacency of these expectations. The article concludes with a reflection on the next destination of the climate regime and on the places where the Paris Agreement leaves the parties in their efforts to combat climate change.

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