Stand

The average age for walking is 12 months. That means that many children will walk before this time and many after. At around 12 months, most children can pull to stand and let go for a few seconds.

 

–Work on squat to stand activities from either having your baby squat while sitting on your lap or having your baby sit across your leg with the 90/90 sitting position (hips and knees are at 90 degrees). Help your child by supporting them when necessary to reach and pick up toys and play. Have them not only reach up for bubbles or a toy on a low table but  also work on reaching down to the ground and return to sit. This will lead to standing from here as well.

— Same position and work on dump and fill activities by placing toys down and a bucket up and vice versa.

–Now is the time for placing your child in standing to play and give some support if needed.

–Gently rock your child’s hips back and forth while they are playing in standing. This prepares their body to take steps by training their body to lean weight away to allow a leg the freedom to take a step.

–Place your child standing backwards against a wall or a sturdy couch. Play hand games and songs with them and help them learn to trust their weight through their legs and balance on their own feet. You can also use bubbles or any toy to distract him or her in this position.

–Have your child stand and lean back into you while facing outwards and help him or her learn to do this during daily activities or when getting dressed. If you are using this during dressing, have him or her lean back into you and lean from one side to the other to step into his or her pants.

–Stand your child facing you in the middle of the floor and see how comfortable they are with you letting go. If they still have quite a bit of fear with this, they are not ready for this. If they are okay with it, slowly move your hands to their hips and then let go one at a time. You can make this a game by counting down or by counting how many seconds they stand by themselves.

Check out more ideas and games in my books:

1.) My Baby Moves: Toddler Games

Gross motor activities using many popular songs and games with all lyrics and ways to incorporate these into playtime with your child. Don’t miss the opportunities every day to interact and help your child grow stronger through songs and games you are familiar with but might not fully remember!

To download this book, click HERE

 

2.) Early Intervention Basics: Birth to 12 Months

This is a guide to all five areas of development for infants 0-12 months. This covers a description of basic skills for each of the five areas: Cognitive, Motor, Social/Emotional, Self-Help, and Communication. Along with the skills, ideas for helping a child attain these skills are given. More emphasis is given to the motor domains; but all areas of development are discussed. This guide is designed for easy reading and can be used by a student, parent, or therapist wanting to explore some ideas for helping a child expand his or her developmental skills.

To download this book, click HERE