Leg braces: does my child need these?

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First, let me say that I probably get 50 % of my emails about this and about foot/leg positions of children in general. I am so glad that you are watching and observing your child. Please be patient as your baby learns to stand and walk, as this usually develops over time with a LOT of changes going on in his or her feet and legs. See my page on toeing in and out for some more information.

The good news is that your child will most likely grow out of whatever you are concerned about but you should always as your pediatrician about any suspected problems to get their expertise. Many problems need to be caught early in order to correct for the best results and if your mommy senses are “tingling” that something isn’t right, I would recommend a professional to evaluate your child. Most pediatricians know when to send you to a therapist. If you are not satisfied, please ask again until you get the information you need.

You are always going to be your child’s best advocate!

For information on books that are available, click HERE

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Discharge from Physical Therapy

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Discharge Day

The smell of flowers blooming filled the air, as I walked to my car. I knew the day that I walked into their home for the first time that this day would come; but that doesn’t make it any easier. For the next several minutes, tears roll down my cheeks, as I try to pull myself together before I reach my next home. That family ┬áneeds me too.

The child I just discharged was dear to my heart. I have been going to that house for over two years…laughed with them…cried with them…rejoiced with them. I am a pediatric PT and I work in the early intervention system, where I see the patients in their own homes. They all work their way into my heart and then the rules say that at age three…it all ends.

I feel great about what we have accomplished together. Every milestone was celebrated and enjoyed to the fullest; but the child still needs so much more and I am no longer the one who will be there to help her learn. Thank goodness for the wonderful clinics that I have referred them to; but I don’t want to stop.

There are so many joys in this job; but the sorrows are there too.

As I arrived at the next house, I saw a small child peering out the front door, watching for me–it’s my next patient. The smile on her face makes the sorrow in my heart dim just a little…

Thank goodness I am still needed!

For activities and ways to play with your child, click HERE

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My baby won’t hold on to me

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Hey everyone,

I have been receiving multiple requests to address this problem. If you sense your baby is not “holding” you with his or her legs and arms, I strongly suggest that you have your baby evaluated by a pediatric physical therapist. This is generally a sign that your child is over using extension in his or her movement patterns. Other signs for this:

–arms stay pulled back and high, even in sitting

–unable to roll or “flips” to roll

–not grabbing feet after about 5 months old

–when on tummy, looks like he or she is “swimming” on tummy with arms and legs held up

This is a partial list. Please send me an email and we can talk further. Generally, this needs to be addressed by someone who can teach you how to hold and carry your baby. For now, try these things:

–carry your baby in a “ball” by curling feet toward hands

–place baby on his or her back and bring feet toward their hands to play peek a boo between his or her feet

–place your child in side lying to play (even if older). This will help bring arms together more.

These are just a few tips. More can be found under the gross motor activity pages for rolling, tummy time, and sitting games.

For more ideas on ways to play with your child, click HERE for available books.

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